Top 10: City Guide Hamburg

© Valentina von Klencke

A Hamburg native, Madeleine has put together a guide to her favorite museums, restaurants, and shops

I haven’t lived in Hamburg in years. But as a proud Hanseat, you know exactly where you come from. The northern German city doesn’t stand for good weather and cordiality (we need a little time to warm up to people), but all the more for beauty, understatement, and Franzbrötchen.

It’s not easy to write about your hometown. In fact, I enjoy eating, drinking, and visiting the same things when I’m at home (see my favorites below).

I grew up in the west of Hamburg – very close to the Elbe. So as soon as I get to the city, I’m looking for a way to get near the water. A walk along the river or the Alster is one of them. Sometimes going jogging. For me, the Elbe and the harbor are the heart of the city. Whenever I drive past it at night on the Elbchaussee (most beautiful spot: at the Himmelsleiter), I get nostalgic at the sight of the movement and the lights.

For me, Hamburg remains pleasantly constant: Once many restaurants or shops have established themselves, they are there forever. And yet the city does not resist change. It likes things elegant and modern and manages to stay natural. You can see that on the Reeperbahn. In no other city will you find such a density of bars, clubs, and red light milieu.

Despite the city’s attempt to give the neighborhood a clean image and to trade out some old-established shops and restaurants, you’ll still find Hamburg originals (Bar Klause on Hans-Albers-Platz or Thai Oasis to sing karaoke on Große Freiheit).

Probably the biggest, most recent change is the Elbphilharmonie. Designed by architectural firm Herzog & de Meuron, the concert hall in HafenCity was completed after almost ten years. Chanel presented its Métiers d’ Arts collection on the premises at the beginning of December and invited the world to Hamburg. According to a study by The Economist, Hamburg recently ranked among the top 10 most livable cities in the world. That’s not a surprise. But what makes this city stand out most is that doesn’t make a big deal out of so many wonderful things. Showing off and bragging – that’s not what we like to do in Hamburg.

If you’re traveling to the north, take these tips for shopping, culinary delights, and culture along with you.

CULTURE

Elbphilharmonie

The concert house opened its doors in 2016. It took a long time, but now musical highlights have a place to take the stage – and with great acoustics. Tickets are much sought-after, but it is also worth taking a look at the 110-meter-high building with its impressive glass façade on the banks of the northern Elbe. If you’re not one to shy away from heights, you should book a ticket to the Plaza – the central viewing platform 37 meters up. As a public space, it is accessible all day.

Elbphilharmonie Hamburg
Platz der Deutschen Einheit
20457 Hamburg

Tickets available here

Deichtorhallen – Hall for Contemporary Art, House of Photography, Falckenberg Collection

This is my favorite museum in Hamburg, not just because of its finely curated exhibitions, but also because of its premises. Due to open steel-glass architecture, the two historic buildings dating from 1911 and 1913 offer a lot of space for installations, paintings, and especially large exhibitions. The Falckenberg Collection complements the museum at a branch in Hamburg-Harburg. The Deichtorhallen have served as a platform and meeting place for contemporary art and photography since 1989.

Deichtorhallen
Deichtorstraße 1-2
20095 Hamburg
Phone: 040 321030

Opening hours:
Tuesday – Sunday: 11am – 6pm (1st Thursday of the month: 11am – 9pm, except holidays). Closed: Mondays, Christmas, New Years.
Additional Information here.

SHOPPING

Anita Hass

Anita Hass has been one of the legendary luxury boutiques in Hamburg since it was founded in 1970. Thanks to its excellent buyers, you’ll not only find established labels like Céline, Saint Laurent, and (recently) Marni, but also younger brands like Ulla Johnson, Khaite, and Ienki Ienki. Also for sale: interior pieces and cosmetics by Dr. Barbara Sturm, Magic Stripes, and Muti (also available online, of course).

Anita Hass
Eppendorfer Landstraße 60
20249 Hamburg
Phone: 040 465909

Opening hours:
Monday – Friday: 10am – 7pm, Saturday: 11am – 6pm.
Additional Information here.

Sautter + Lackmann

The Sautter + Lackmann bookstore is one of my favorite shops in Hamburg. Specialist books on fashion, film, art, architecture, photography, and much more are available here. And if it’s not in stock, they’ll organize it. The most exciting publications – including old finds, magazines, and films – pile up to the ceiling. Wonderful.

Sautter + Lackmann
Admiralitätstraße 71/72
20459 Hamburg
Phone: 040 373196

Opening hours:
Monday – Friday: 10am – 7pm, Saturday: 11am – 6pm.
Additional Information here.

Bon Voyage

This small interiors shop in Eppendorf has been open since the end of 2016. From Mediterranean-inspired furniture, ceramics, and linen textiles to candles and cushions, you’ll find everything here. It’s no surprise that the owner gets inspiration from travels through the South of France.

Bon Voyage
Lehmweg 32
20251 Hamburg
Phone: 040 22605453

Opening hours:
Monday: 2pm – 7pm, Tuesday – Friday: 11am – 7pm, Saturday: 11am – 6pm.
Additional Information here.

Restaurant / Bar / Café

Lühmanns Teestube

Lühmanns can be found in the middle of the Blankenese district. You sit quite rustically on antique furniture between knick-knacks and ships in bottles and eat huge pieces of cake off of grandmother’s porcelain. The impressive cake buffet is accompanied by homemade scones and a selection of around 40 different teas. I also recommend the morning, midday, and evening menus.

Lühmanns Teestube
Blankeneser Landstraße 29B
22587 Hamburg
Phone: 040 86 34 41

Opening hours:
Monday – Friday: 9am – 11pm, Saturday: 9am – 6pm, Sunday: 10am – 11pm.
Additional Information here.

Kajüte S.B. 12

If you are going to Blankenese and would like to go for a walk along the Elbe beach, you should take a fish sandwich with you to the legendary Kajüte S. B. 12 – and a cup of hot chocolate.

Kajüte S.B. 12
Strandweg 79
22587 Hamburg
Phone: 040 86648640

Opening hours:
March – October: daily from 11am.
November – March: Thursday – Sunday: from 11am, food from 12noon – 9pm.
Additional Information here.

Ristorante Portonovo

This Italian restaurant is situated directly on the jetty, or rather on the Alster. You can spend a very romantic evening here with pasta, red wine, and a fantastic view over the Alster. Perfect.

Ristorante Portonovo
Alsterufer 2
20354 Hamburg
Phone:  040 41356616

Opening hours:
12noon – 23:30pm, Sundays until 10pm.
Additional Information here.

Bistro Carmagnole / Café Paris

If you like all things French, then you should know these two restaurants. Bistro Carmagnole has secured a firm place in Hamburg’s gastronomy scene for some years now. Hidden on a side street in the Schanze district, you can enjoy really simple French cuisine here in the evening.

Bistro Carmagnole
Juliusstrasse 18
22769 Hamburg

Opening hours:
Tuesday – Sunday: 6pm – 10pm.
Additional Information here.

 

You can start your day with breakfast, sit down for lunch, and ring out the evening with steak tartare at the famous Café Paris, which also offers impressive Art Nouveau aesthetics.

Café Paris
Rathausstraße 4
20095 Hamburg

Opening hours:
Monday – Friday: 9am – 23:30pm, Saturday – Sunday: 9:30am – 23:30pm.
Additional Information here.

Le Lion – Bar de Paris

Bar Le Lion is directly across the street from Café Paris. You’ll have to be very formal and ring the doorbell if you want to go in. Inside is a stylish bar with velvet furniture and brocade on the walls. Favorite drinks: Basil Smash and Whiskey Sour.

Le Lion – Bar de Paris
Rathausstr. 3
20095 Hamburg
Phone: 040 334753780

Opening hours:
Monday – Saturday: from 6pm.
Additional Information here.

One last tip: If you’re walking through the inner city and through Hamburg’s streets, look up every now and then. Hamburg’s façades and rooftops are really beautiful!

Madeleine is a fashion journalist. For as long as she can remember she has been passionate about fashion and accessories, in particular cashmere sweaters and jewelry. After five years of working at Vogue Germany’s fashion department in Munich, she decided to encounter a new challenge and move to Berlin. Her role at hey woman! allows her to combine her passion for styling, creative directing and writing. Madeleine is also good at imitating a Swiss accent and trying to be a cook.

©Phillip Schlegel