Shopping: Ruffled Blouses

Winona Ryder inspired Veronika to create an outfit with a ruffled blouse. And because the look was so popular on Instagram, Madeleine has picked out the most beautiful styles

Veronika was working in Paris in November, and soon we’ll see what she brought back with her (a little tip: she was there on a special interview mission).  But as another small souvenir from her trip, she delighted us with pictures of her wearing something pretty: a white blouse with frilled collar. This style has been very popular for several seasons and is a firm part of labels like Isabel Marant and Erdem’s repertoire. But other fashion houses are also constantly rediscovering the ruffled blouse for themselves.

Ruffles on necklines and collars were already a fashion during the Renaissance. In the 16th century, these soon developed into the ruff, which was typical of the Elizabethan era and of the English queen herself (it looks like a big wheel worn around the neck). Thankfully, this variant on the collar is still a long way from making a comeback.

 

What has remained are the small ruffles and flounces on blouses and collars that have become firmly anchored in fashion. Paired with a white shirt, which was something originally worn by aristocrats, this seems to be a very successful combination. Until the 19th century, white shirts were reserved for men who were reluctant to get their hands dirty. The women’s version differed in its button placket. Whereas the men’s version was buttoned from left to right, the women’s closed from right to left. Why? At that time, the ladies of the upper class were dressed by maids, and that made it easier for them.

Men had to put on their shirts themselves. They had it really hard… The different button plackets may have remained, but in the meantime women can also dress themselves all on their own, especially Veronika. Her Paris look was inspired by Winona Ryder (one of her style icons and the inspiration for the editorial with Liebeskind) in the 1990 film Mermaids. In the film, the then very young actress enchanted audiences in a white blouse with a Peter Pan collar, worn with a chain and a cross pendant.

Veronika’s interpretation of the look – including a cross necklace by Stone Paris – led to a multitude of questions over Instagram. What label was it? The answer: Erdem x H&M for men. Sorry – sold out (too bad). But reason enough to tell a little story about blouses and provide some inspiration for new styles.

Madeleine is a fashion journalist. For as long as she can remember she has been passionate about fashion and accessories, in particular cashmere sweaters and jewelry. After five years of working at Vogue Germany’s fashion department in Munich, she decided to encounter a new challenge and move to Berlin. Her role at hey woman! allows her to combine her passion for styling, creative directing and writing. Madeleine is also good at imitating a Swiss accent and trying to be a cook.

©Phillip Schlegel